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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
today in what could be the last chance to come talk before the u.s. falls off the fiscal cliff next week. >>> investors are bracing for the final eurozone bond sale of the year. italy will sell up to 6 billion later today. >> and the yen has been sent lower and stocks to their highest level in 21 months. >>> this is the final "worldwide exchange" from london of the year. louisa is here for it. >> i can't believe it. it's my last working day of the year, as well. >> is it? >> yes. >> unfortunately we'll still be talking about the same thing we're talking about now. >> although i feel we'll be talking more debt ceiling, as well. >> and speaking of which, president obama is trying a last ditch effort to restart budget talks days before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff. speaker john boehner has called the house back into session sunday evening. house majority leader eric cantor is telling his members to be prepared to work through january 2nd. both sides are still far apart on taxes and spending cuts. harry reid says prospect deals by monday are unlikely. minority leader mitch mcconnell s
it in perspective. the euro/u.s. dollar didn't move that much whatsoever. from that point of view, i don't think that we just have to look at today or the last two days of development in euro/u.s. dollar. of course, global trade is really important for the german economy. it continues to be very important. even from a private consumption point of view, we did have quite a bit of support as of late. also because of the wages. and looking at the world bank report, also looking at the asian economies in 2013, 2014, them seeing a little better picture is very good for the german economy and not to speak about the turnaround in the u.s. which seems to be stabilizing, looking this also at the housing market. so business sentiment better than expected. it is rising. the current conditions a little weaker than expected. add to that the financial analyst numbers we had as of late, also better than expected. not too bad. >> patricia, we'll see you again next hour. thank you very much for following all the latest there. >> sure. >>> now, shares in ubs have edged up in early trade after the bank announced a
of just 2.5% in the u.s., 1.5% in canada and zero growth in the uk. locally, cutbacks in government spending weighed on the numbers and lower commodity prices also impacted on cash flow and the government is facing more criticism about its effort to keep the budget in surplus while the economy grows. >> the government has had the objective of making sure that we would bring our budget back to surplus when growth has been around trend. what we've been seeking to do through good budget policy has been to provide maximum flexibility to the reserve bank to a just rate so. the government will always put in place appropriate budget settings which will support growth and jobs. >> still, analysts say growth could slow further as the mining investment boom peaks. yesterday, the bank of australia cut interest rates to a record low of 3% and traders are looking further easing next year to offset the falling talks of trade, the high australian daughter and further cutbacks in government spending. >> despite that prognosis for rates and the fact that we're now matching the record lows here, the
target. talks about the level of u.s. production, rivalries between iran and saudi arabia, and a new secretary general could get heated. >>> italy likely to see a strong uptai uptake thanks to supply reductions before year end. >>> and let's twist again. the fed set to announce a fresh around of bond purchases to match the outgoing twist program at the end of the year. >>> the international community blasts north korea after it successfully launches a long-range rocket, prompting an emergency u.n. security council meeting. >>> all right. a very good morning to you. we are going to be on to opec later. we've got the latest i.a. data out this morning. they're saying global oil demand projected around 90.5 million barrels a day. more than forecast. they say non-opec production bouncing back. an something bit. they're saying opec crude supply inched up in november led by higher output from saudi arabia. >> i think we'll have to call this today the case of the two oil reports. we have the opec report that they put out ahead of the meeting showing different figures from what the iea is say
:20. and the outlook for u.s. credit market appears less rose city. we'll speak to a moody's analyst that says high duration credit could be badly exposed. the european central bank is announcing either monetary policy decisions later today. economists expect ecb to stay pat on rates. its revised down its forecasts in 2013. hot on the heels from her stint in brusselss, silvia has moved back to frankfurt and the ecb headquarters. how more pessimistic might they be today in their forecasts. >> that's the big question. if they get too clee to the zero for the forecast next year, anything below let's say 0.4, 0.3 would be considered a little bit more bearish and that would of course increase the chances or risks whatever you want to look at it for further rate cut somewhere down the pike early next year, maybe january or february. the consensus for today is as you said no change on rates. remember a month ago, there were many calling for rate cut this month, but that seems to have receded right now. maybe also because the data we see out of the eurozone is rather mixed. everybody quite agrees that foir
people at a u.s. military base. >> the man blew up a car packed with explosives. police say at least six others were injured. the taliban has claimed responsibility for the attack, which came just days after a shooting inside police headquarters. the egyptian president has signed into law a controversial new constitution after official confirmation should a clear majority for the document in a referendum. >> morsi is due to address parliament on saturday after appointing 90 members to the senate. >> critics say the new basic law is islamist and undemocratic. >> the opposition kept up its protest for weeks, but it was not enough. anchor fled on the streets of cairo after official results were announced. critics say the referendum was marred by fraud. am i in my opinion, the revolution continues, and the constitution does not exist. a constitution has to be for everyone, not split the people of egypt. >> everybody knows the results are wrong. i will continue protesting peacefully until our demands are met. >> egypt's election commission says nearly 64% of voters approved the constitution i
national defense, history and geography of, and the u.s. economy. a television series based upon pages history of the estates is currently in development as well. we are pleased to welcome dr. schweikart today to hear about his newest book, "a patriot's history of the modern world," which in this case is going to be from 1898 to just after the second world war. please join me in welcoming larry schweikart. larry? [applause] >> well, thanks so much to heritage foundation for inviting me here. it's really an honor and it's one that which my father was alive to see. heritage is one of those great passions of liberty and a swelling sea of collectivism. you probably do know that you are getting somebody here that was a previous rock drummer. this later became significant in learning, as a learning experience when i began working on this film. but all along my expenses in the rock band were pretty informative. i, student i know all about communism because i was in a rock band. we shared everything, had nothing and start. when mike allen and i wrote "a patriot's history of the united states"
for the presidential race. walker won the first governor in u.s. history to survive a recall election. and another nod to a republican governor. >> i cannot thank the president enough for his personal concern and compassion for our state and for the people of our state. >> reporter: new jersey governor chris christie's full-on embrace of president obama for helping sandy-ravaged new jersey came days before the election and had no noticeable effect on the presidential race, but some republicans think christie didn't have to be that efuse sieve. they'll remember if his name pops up in 2016. >> if it's a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down. >> reporter: from the say what category of entries comes a combo team, missouri senate candidate todd akin and richard murdoch of indiana. >> life is that gift from god, and i think even when life begins in that horrible situation of rape, that it is something that god intended to happen. >> republican dreams to take control of the senate in 2012 had dwipdalled throughout the year, but akin and maur dock pretty much shut that
they are investing from pre-k through college. there will have more in china and any of them the entire u.s. work force. we're focused on a global economy. those from harvard are competing globally with students from china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate education from three years to four years because they think it is not giving students enough time. there are all
-- but it is happening. but you would take note and stop to think about it anymore. >> 2012 here in the u.s. gave us a glimpse of the sort of future that is in store if we do not do something to avert -- if we don't shift away from business as usual. we saw record temperatures last summer. we saw record drought for large for the country. in colorado, that came together with record fuel. because of the pine bark beetle infestation, due to record warm winters, it was literally a perfect storm of macroclimate's and assesses the came together to bring this wildfire. we saw american storm. and hurricane. it broke previous records and flooding in new york city. and there's certainly a climate change in the sense that, from the 13 -- at least 1 foot of that would have saved lives. that is the difference between a bad and a disastrous flooding event. that storm was sitting over near-record temperatures. we saw that a year ago. warm temperatures were sitting off the east coast of the u.s. it was a slower-moving storm and is the goal of the moisture, leading to record flooding over a large part of the western
casualties. hezbollah attacked u.s. armed forces directly forcing a humiliating withdrawal from lebanon. a cia station chief was tortured and killed, and u.s. secrets and interests compromised, and that was just in one decade. or consider those days from israel's point of view. during the 1980s, jerusalem faced well arms regimes. leading members of the rejectionist camp that launched permanent hostilities. no arab regime would speak openly about peace with israel. the official charter of the palestinian liberation organization called for replacement with a palestinian state. his chief tactic was terrorism. against israelis, europeans and americans. today the soviet union has collapsed, hussein is gone. syrian regime is teetering. israel has grown to become a regional military super power. it's defense budget is larger now than that of all its neighbors put together. its technological advantages put it in another league. the palestinian authority affirms israel's existence and works with it regularly. iran remains a threat. it is isolated, contained by few other countries in history. the
. these are the stakes we're looking at in syria just moments ago the u.s. state department reiterated that an attack such as this would not be tolerated. chief washington correspondent james rosen is live at the state department with the very latest. james? >> reporter: megyn, good afternoon. a spokesman for secretary of state hillary clinton says this afternoon that these u.s. warnings about the potential use of chemical weapons against the syrian people are being conveyed to the regime of president bah shark al assad both publicly and privately. western intelligence agencies over the last week have detected suspicious movements of chemical weapons components at selected sites inside syria. the regime is thought to be growing more desperate as fighting in and around the capital city, damascus, at the same time has intensified. today brings word of a high school teacher and 29 students being killed in a mortar incident at a school there. meantime, nato officials say once the parliaments in germany and the netherlands -- which is expected -- it'll be only a matter of weeks until missile systems are i
it is manufacturing, but is there really a demand question about apple's products that is a real one? >> not in the u.s., but there could be some questions about china, remember that report from steve milanovich? he said apple needs to come up within some real innovations, you need to have some clarity on the pipeline, and you need geographic -- clearance to go into china? yes, it got it with two of the smaller carriers. china confirms talks with apple. but the problem here, he says tech is not an issue, it's mainly about the business model and benefit sharing issues. that could be a problem. >> he is also playing the part of what many analysts are doing, which is let me explain why it's going down, in the same way that the death cross, i always love the death cross, this is a technical term. i can think of a million reasons to sell it. the only reason i want to own it is because it makes the best products in the world and it's inexpensive. >> that's a lot of people looking at the chart. >> look again, the people who own apple, they were the ones who owned it because it was going up. it reminds me very
again at those five most important words from my perspective in the middle of the preamble of the u.s. constitution, providing for the common defense, that we are doing that and exactly that with this measure. so i encourage my colleagues to support this conference -- the rule and the conference report that we will have and i believe it will be of great benefit to our men and women in uniform and to the future security of the united states of america and our allies and i thank my friend for yielding me the 15 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: i yield 1 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. altmire. mr. altmire: mr. speaker, as we begin debate on this act, it's critical we understand just how important it is to our troops and to our country that we pass this legislation with a bipartisan vote. it's easy to get bogged down in partisanship on most issues, but this cannot be one of them. this legislation provides the men and women of our armed forces the necessary equipment and financial support to ef
, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part to instruct boeing to build. -- to build in the deficit areas of the u.s. it is pragmatic. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollarized, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing -- unless those who do not have dollars are given dollars to spend purchasing, the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. the 1950's and the 1960's. a period of immense stability very low inflation. very low unemployment. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why did it end? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism could no longer be sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. -- if you do not have it? enter a young turk in 1971. actually, he was the american, but you know what i mean. well, paul volcker -- that name may ring a bell. in 1971, paul
's been a gang buster year for the markets. unfortunately, the average u.s. investor out there has largely been on the sidelines. money in bonds, money into money market funds continuing to flow in the month of november. unfortunately, even as we do see a very, very good year for the stock market, not many investors are really taking part in this. >> i think we saw finally an outflow for bond funds in well over a year last week. that has been a rarity. we've warned many of our viewers, be careful of the duration risk. we're going into another year where many people are at least saying, okay, is the rally over? the 30-year rally in bonds, is it over? if it is, what is it going to mean? we've had people saying that the last three years. everybody's best trade was to short the long bond. it ended up being one of the worst trades you could make the last couple of years. >> in terms of being careful, speaking of being careful, today will be light volume, shortened session, but light volume. who knows what that could lead to. if you wanted bury bad news, christmas eve is the perfect day to do it
. but internally you have tribal rivalries that have to be played out or sometimes a u.s. corporation in one city with one group of people creates resentment among and other. there want to rebuild neighborhoods, but they don't want to be seen as lackeys of the americans. gives you a strange dynamic and gives you insight into the impact that history has been to the support of the world that is used to congress for thousands of years. it been able to create a relationship and hedge their bets. apart from the human tragedies, your heart breaks when you read about someone he just had a baby a few days earlier, spoke to his wife before he went on a mission and nine helicopter crash. your heart breaks and reminds you of the human cost and also reminds you of the logistical challenge. >> did this book makes you regret operation afghanistan? >> no. i just think it reminds us of the challenges of the. the end of the day after ana says it -- afghanistan is important. you don't want to create a safe haven for people to the be able to come back and reconstitute, but it's also about pakistan. to have an unsta
have placed those same individuals under u.s. sanctions. talks between the garcia government and the environment -- m 23 began on december 29 in uganda and are being mediated with uganda as the chair on the international conference of the great lakes region known as the i c g lra. as the two sides begin substantive con -- talks, the current cease-fire is holding and the parties continue to express commitment to a dialogue. much of the m-23's military success and prowess and would not have been possible without outside support. there's a credit to ballpark -- body of evidence that corroborates the assertions of the u.n. experts that the rwanda government provided significant military and political support to the end-23. while there is evidence of uganda providing support to and- 23, we do not have a body of evidence suggesting that the ugandan government as a policy supported the m-23. nonetheless, we sit and -- we continue to urge, ugandan officials that -- to make sure that supplies do not originate or travel through that territory. and we have not limited our response to di
. -- and 2008. the u.s. utilizing its trade deficit with the rest of the world has been operating like a huge vacuum cleaner. sucking into the united states the net exports of europe, japan, and lately china. thus providing exporters -- germany, japan, or china -- with the requisite demand necessary. so, the ever expanding trade deficit was not an accident. it was a very clever way of replacing one that surplus recycling system with another. the first one, it was one where america had a surplus and america decided instead of doing what germany is doing at the moment -- which is cutting its nose to spite its face, and thereby ending the -- entering recession by cutting, cutting, cutting -- volcker as the head of the fed at a different idea. we are going to expand our dominance and are well by -- and our wealth by expanding our deficit and using our deficits to provide the rest of the world with the demand which is necessary to grow their economies, even at the expense of hours. -- ours. and who is going to pay for the deficit? if i have an ever-expanding deficit, the bank tells me it is came o
? thank you. you do look familiar. where did i see you before? u.s. they good question, did you not? -- you asked a good question, did you not? what is your name again? >> danielle. >> you are old hat here. you do this all of the time. good to see you. have fun. >> have fun, hey. show me what we are doing. what kind of lollipops are these? is this white house honey? do you know these come from bees we keep in the backyard? why? they make fresh honey, and the health the garden grove. -- they help the garden grow. >> this is good. >> did you taste these? this is good. [laughter] these are really good. ?id you put sugar on these ne how do you get it curly? >> they turned out really cute, and it is a good crunch. we should give some of the photographers some of these to see how good they taste. those are so good. healthy, tasty expects. not bad. -- snacks. not bad. ok. now we desperate. i have to figure out what design. -- now we have to decorate. now i have to figure out what design. decisions, decisions. ok. >> this is all edible, ok, guys? >> once you put this on, you can eat this lo
and broke off. their interpretation of the news was critical for the u.s. government. likewise, time and newsweek. i mean, you now have -- pardon me. you now have many more news broadcasts and we have the internet. so if we could just get rid of the new york times, the problem would be about 25 percent salt. i actually am serious about that because of its influence on media elites throughout the country who look at it to determine how to understand the world. >> please join and then taking the panelists. [applause] >> every weekend book tv offers 48 hours of programming focused on nonfiction authors and books. watch it here on c-span2. >> now from a conference on the 60th anniversary of the publication of whitaker chambers witness, a panel entitled without anti communism what defines conservatives to that. it's about an hour. >> so could not help remember someone was talking about the adulation which the world health i don't know if everyone here is aware. in august educational institution not too far from here, a bard college, there is actually in alger humanities. my colleague the
and rights of the house. signed, sincerely, david russell, district liaison, u.s. representative david price. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the house stands adjourned until 2:00 >> we are going back to the conference on women in leadership with andrea mitchell and nancy-ann deparle. >> she gave me the notion i could do anything i wanted to do. >> how did she do that? >> she had very high expectations and let me know she expected me to do well in school. when i would talk to her about wanting to work in the white house for being interested in politics or being a lawyer, she said you have to study hard and make good grades. you need to get a scholarship because i will not be able to afford it. she never said -- the sky was the limit. that really was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i did go to law school. in the early 1980's when i got out of law school, i went back to tennessee to practice. i was going around to law firms. there were not that many women in the law firms. i had guys interview me. they would sit me down and say, do you understand you have to try cas
about his new book. he also discussed china and the history of the u.s. constitution. this is just over an hour. >> ok. concepts. for 20 years i have been advising -- roughly half of that on financial economic matters. the other half a variety of topics. about 10 years ago, um we started -- about 10 years ago, we started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the state's. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, study them, and then customize them as appropriate for our own system. and yet in this one respect, they have been a little b
. and we face a multitude of problems from abroad. the u.s. fiscal cliff, the slowing growth in china, above all the eurozone now in recession. people know that there are no quick fixes to these problems, but they want to know that we are making progress, and the message from today's autumn statement is that we are making progress. it is a hard road, but we're getting there, and britain is on the right track. >> will the chancellor resume his seat. now, look, let's be clear about this. the house knows well enough by now that i will afford a very full opportunity for questioning of the chancellor. but the more interruption, the greater the noise, the longer the session will take, and that cannot be right. so i appeal to members, please, to give the chancellor a courteous hearing as, indeed, if it becomes necessary i will appeal to government back benches to afford a fair hearing to the shadow chancellor. that's how it should be. the chancellor. >> mr. speaker, britain is on the right track, and turning back now would be a disaster. we have much more to do. the deficit has fallen by a q
totingham, sir we look up in disgunfight and disbelief at discrimination. the u.s. after the civil war, racism. britain in the 180000s, sexism. it wasn't until someone had the initiative to stand up and say, this is wrong, that discrimination was overcome the black civil rights movement for my first example and the suffrage yet mement as my second. but we're still discriminating. at the time, the phrase, equality for all -- it's ridiculous with the age discrimination regarding minimum wage inrder to increase the quality in our democracy the manipulate wage needs to be standard figure for all. the thought that young people areelow their infear you're colleagues and less deserving of a higher wage is outdated, ewan equal. we need to fight for civil liberties for all young people, and with that comes minimum wage for all and for that reason it should be our national campaign. [applause] >> thank you. i'm sorry. we have to wind up the debate becaus we have reached our allotted time. i just want before i call -- to welcome the honorable gentlemen, colonel stewart, who entered the chamber at
attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special account told by janet reno -- special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was stan
. please. >> from south totingham, sir we look up in disgunfight and disbelief at discrimination. the u.s. after the civil war, racism. britain in the 180000s, sexism. it wasn't until someone had the initiative to stand up and say, this is wrong, that discrimination was overcome the black civil rights movement for my first example and the suffrage yet movement as my second. but we're still discriminating. at the time, the phrase, equality for all -- it's ridiculous with the age discrimination regarding minimum wage in order to increase the quality in our democracy the manipulate wage needs to be standard figure for all. the thought that young people are below their infear you're colleagues and less deserving of a higher wage is outdated, ewan equal. we need to fight for civil liberties for all young people, and with that comes minimum wage for all and for that reason it should be our national campaign. [applause] >> thank you. i'm sorry. we have to wind up the debate because we have reached our allotted time. i just want before i call -- to welcome the honorable gentlemen, colonel stewart
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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